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Posts tagged “Top 10”

By Robert Rapier on Dec 30, 2013 with 12 responses

The Top 5 Energy Stories of 2013

In the previous two article, I presented my choices for articles that almost made my Top 10 Energy Stories of 2013, as well as the bottom half of my Top 10 Energy Stories for 2013.

Here are my choices for the top half of my Top 10 energy related stories of 2013. The rankings are mostly in no particular order, although for me there was one clear story at the top of the list. CONTINUE»

By Robert Rapier on Dec 27, 2013 with 11 responses

The Top 10 Energy Stories of 2013 (#6-10)

In the previous article, I presented my choices for articles that almost made my Top 10 Energy Stories of 2013. In the next two articles I will present my choices for the Top 10. The rankings are mostly in no particular order.

6. The year in coal

The US coal industry has been in decline for several years. The primary factors behind the decline are competition from cheaper and cleaner natural gas, and increasingly stringent government regulations. This year the EPA published draft regulations for new coal-fired power plants that will likely be economically impossible to meet. CONTINUE»

By Robert Rapier on Dec 24, 2013 with 5 responses

Top Energy Stories of 2013 – Honorable Mention

My Top 10 energy related stories of 2013 ended up being a 3,500 word story, so I decided to break it up into three parts. Today I will list some of the stories that could have arguably been placed in a list of Top 10 energy stories for the year. Later this week I will list stories 6-10 of my Top 10, and then early next week I will list my Top 5.

Note that this list of Honorable Mentions simply entails the headline without any detail, and are in no particular order. The Top 10 goes into detail on each story, which is why the story ended up being so long. CONTINUE»

By Robert Rapier on Dec 31, 2012 with 2 responses

The Top 10 Energy Stories of 2012

Happy New Year’s to readers everywhere! Last week we posted a poll listing 15 of the major energy stories of 2012. Readers voted, and the Top 10 are presented below with a short narrative describing the story.

1. Revolution in US oil and gas production continues

The fracking revolution in the US continued, with oil production at its highest level since 1998 and dry natural gas production at an all-time high. President Obama became the first president since LBJ to serve in office during four consecutive years of increasing US oil production. The International Energy Agency (IEA) projected that by 2020 the US will become the world’s largest oil producer. They also projected that the US would become a net oil exporter again by 2030, which would be the first time that has happened since the 1940s. CONTINUE»

By Robert Rapier on Dec 24, 2012 with 8 responses

Vote for the Top Energy Stories of 2012

For the past several years, at year end I rank what I felt were the the major energy stories of the year. 2012 lacked a blockbuster energy story like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 or the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster of 2011, so there was no clear #1 in my mind. But, I thought I would change things up a bit and just let readers vote. So below I have summarized 15 of the major energy stories of the year in no particular order. Please vote for up to 5 stories, and I will report the Top 10 vote getters on December 31. CONTINUE»

By Robert Rapier on Dec 29, 2011 with 38 responses

Top 10 Energy Related Stories of 2011

Here are my choices for the Top 10 energy related stories of 2011. Don’t get too hung up on the relative rankings. They are mostly in no particular order, although I think the top story is pretty obvious. 1. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster On March 11, 2011 the tsunami that flooded Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant resulted in the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl. The tragedy spurred heated debates over whether nuclear power could ever be totally risk-free. Several countries decided that the potential consequences were just too great, and reversed their plans for new nuclear plants and in some cases shuttered existing plants. The incident will likely slow the global development of nuclear power for years, just as… Continue»