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Posts tagged “oil imports”

By Robert Rapier on Jun 23, 2014 with 14 responses

Where The US Got Its Oil in 2013

How Much Oil Do We Import?

As events in Iraq continue to unfold, we have been getting quite a few queries on just how much oil the US imports from Iraq. In my previous post – The Top 10 Oil Producers in 2013 — I showed that even though the US is a major oil producer, we are an even greater oil consumer. So we import millions of barrels a day of oil from over 40 countries — one of which is in fact Iraq.

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) tracks US oil imports and finished product exports, and I have tabulated our Top 10 sources of crude oil imports from 2013. Overall, the US imported 7.7 million barrels per day (bpd) of crude oil in 2013, a 2 million bpd decline since 2008. We imported another 2.1 million bpd of finished products like diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel, but we also exported 3.6 million bpd of petroleum and petroleum products (mostly as finished products).

Where Does Our Imported Oil Come From?

Of the 7.7 million bpd of crude oil imports, 3.5 million bpd (45 percent of the total) came from OPEC countries. Saudi Arabia was our largest OPEC supplier at 1.3 million bpd (17 percent of the crude import total). But our biggest supplier of crude continues to be Canada. The 2.6 million bpd of crude we got from Canada in 2013 represents a 66 percent increase in the past 10 years and made up a third of US crude oil imports in 2013.

US Crude Imports in 2013

Top 10 Sources of US Crude Oil Imports in 2013 (million barrels per day).  CONTINUE»

By Russ Finley on Mar 22, 2014 with 43 responses

Will Government Mandated Corn Ethanol Consumption Ever End?

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This spring, the EPA will likely reduce the amount of corn ethanol that must be blended into our fuel supply by about 1.3 billion gallons (for a total of about 13 billion gallons) simply because our transportation system can’t absorb any more of it without exceeding a 10% blend, risking damage to cars. This is called the “10% blend wall.” Unlike beef, or chicken, gasoline, or smart phones, ethanol consumption isn’t consumer driven. In general, because consumers could care less about corn ethanol, fuel blenders also could care less about it except as an economically viable anti-knock additive in more modest quantities. They have to be forced to blend more of it by the government. Unless or until some unforeseen consumer demand arises, mandated blending will be necessary to keep the corn ethanol industry solvent.

And just as importantly, where is future growth going to come from? We can’t use all of our corn crop. This isn’t new technology. We’ve been making moonshine by distilling ethanol from fermented seeds and fruit for thousands of years. CONTINUE»

By Geoffrey Styles on Aug 29, 2013 with 2 responses

How Falling Imports Doubled the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

The SPR Grew Without Buying A Barrel

Although mainly focused on the oil market’s current jitters over Syria, Liam Denning’s Wednesday “Heard on the Street” column in the Wall St. Journal neatly highlights the extraordinary degree to which resurgent US oil production and weaker US demand have boosted the effectiveness of US oil inventories, including the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Without adding a drop — the SPR actually shrank a bit in 2011 — the reserve’s potential to replace daily imports in a crisis has soared as those imports have declined.

In the near term this could prove extremely helpful should expected US-led reprisals against the Syrian government result in a regional disruption of oil flows. Longer term, it serves as a further reminder that the existing SPR was designed for another era and is overdue for a major rethink.
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By CER News Desk on Dec 13, 2012 with 2 responses

Exxon Report Says U.S. Energy Production Surge to Continue

A new report released this week by fuel giant Exxon says the energy production revival in the United States will continue into the far future, confirming the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) prediction that the country will become a new exporter of energy by 2025.

The annual long-term energy report outlines Exxon’s view of the surging American energy sector, taking into account new production in both the U.S. and Canada, along with increased energy efficiency and expanded distribution networks, in determining the country’s energetic future, with the report also noting that generally flat demand around the developed world is expected over the next 10-15 years. (Read More: U.S. Energy Production to Hit Record Highs)

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By CER News Desk on Dec 11, 2012 with no responses

Report: U.S. Energy Production to Hit Record Highs

Even as reports are being released that suggest that the United States will slowly increase its energy output, the American government itself has underscored that fact with its own report detailing energy-related forecasts through 2040.

The report, issued by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), draws many conclusions, perhaps most important among them the fact that, while American energy imports accounted for 19 percent of its population’s use in 2011, that same number will drop to only 9 percent in 2040 as the country positions itself as a world energy powerhouse. (Read More: How Much Oil Does the World Produce?)

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By Will Rogers on Nov 21, 2012 with 2 responses

How National Security Planners Should View America’s Energy Boom

Increased Domestic Oil & Gas Production, Declining Demand and Shrinking Imports

The American energy revolution is starting to come into focus. Technological breakthroughs in shale gas and tight oil production are poised to make the United States — not Saudi Arabia — the world’s largest producer of crude oil as early as the end of the decade, according to the latest World Energy Outlook published by the International Energy Agency (IEA). The IEA’s analysis found that the United States could even be a net exporter of oil by 2035, a position the United States has not been in since the 1940s, when it had one of the world’s few developed oil industries.

At the same time, U.S. demand for crude oil is in decline and its crude oil imports are shrinking. Higher fuel efficiency standards in U.S. vehicles have contributed largely to depressed demand, with U.S. oil imports falling from 56 percent of total consumption to 46 percent between 2008 and the end of 2011, according to the U.S. Energy Information Agency. By 2035, the United States could be importing less than 2 million barrels a day, down from more than 8 million barrels today, according to the IEA. (Read More: Top 15 Sources for U.S. Crude Oil Imports in 2011)

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By CER News Desk on Nov 13, 2012 with 2 responses

U.S. Set to Become World’s Largest Oil Producer by 2017

A new report from the International Energy Agency (IEA), a group made up of 28 nations, says that the United States will surpass fossil fuel giants Russia and Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest oil producer by the year 2017.

The United States is closer than many think to true energy self-sufficiency, says the annual long-term report, contrasting sharply with previous IEA numbers that suggested that Saudi Arabia would remain the world’s top oil producer until at least 2035. (Read more: Hofmeister: Surging Demand and Flat Production Equals High Oil Prices)

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By Will Rogers on Jun 4, 2012 with 6 responses

Whither the Carter Doctrine? Reassessing U.S. Energy Interests in the Middle East

America’s relationship with Middle East energy resources is changing. Technological breakthroughs in hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”), renewed drilling in ultra-deep waters in the Gulf of Mexico and, soon, drilling in the Arctic Circle are re-energizing U.S. domestic petroleum production and shrinking the demand for foreign petroleum imports. Meanwhile, oil and natural gas production in the Americas — from Canada in the North, to Brazil and Colombia in the South — are beginning to displace U.S. reliance on Middle East oil. These emerging energy trends will affect America’s relationship with the Middle East in important ways. But do not expect a fundamental shift in U.S. foreign policy in the region any time soon.

The Carter Doctrine and U.S. Energy Interests in the Middle East

The United States has had historical concerns about assured access to Middle East petroleum resources that have shaped U.S. involvement in the region. President Jimmy Carter famously declared in his 1980 State of the Union address that the United States reserved the right to use force to protect the flow of petroleum from the Middle East to the United States: “An attempt by any outside force to gain control of the Persian Gulf region will be regarded as an assault on the vital interests of the United States of America, and such an assault will be repelled by any means necessary, including military force.”

Although U.S. interests in the Middle East have become more complex since the Carter administration – to include concerns about violent extremism, human rights abuse and nuclear proliferation – it has become almost axiomatic to say that U.S. involvement in the Middle East has been tied solely to concerns about securing access to the region’s petroleum resources. Whether or not one buys that, the perception that U.S. interests in the Middle East are tied solely to concerns about energy supplies raises some questions about whether the United States will lose interest in the Middle East as it becomes less reliant on energy imports from the region.

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By Robert Rapier on Apr 9, 2012 with 62 responses

Canada Rises and Saudi Slides: Top 15 Sources for U.S. Crude Oil Imports in 2011

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently published an article on 2011 U.S. crude oil imports. I thought it might be interesting to take a look at where the U.S. currently obtains its oil, and how that has changed over the past decade. The EIA story is: Nearly 69% of U.S. crude oil imports originated from five countries in 2011. I downloaded their data sources for 2011 import data, and then also went into the archives and pulled up 2001 import data to create the following table:

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By Samuel R. Avro on Mar 27, 2012 with 2 responses

U.S. Crude Oil Imports Down 12% Since 2005

Foreign Oil Imports at Lowest Level Since Before Y2K

U.S. crude oil imports have fallen to their lowest level since 1999, according to data provided by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an arm of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE).

Crude oil imports for 2011 averaged 8.9 million barrels per day (bbl/d), falling below the 9 million bbl/d mark for the first time since 1999, and down 12 percent since hitting a peak of 10.1 million bbl/d in 2005.


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