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Posts tagged “charts”

By Samuel R. Avro on Apr 2, 2012 with 4 responses

Wind Power Continues Trend of Rapid Growth in U.S.

Generation from wind turbines in the United States increased 27% in 2011 from the prior year, and is up 350% since 2006.

“During the past five years capacity additions of wind turbines were the main driver of the growth in wind power output,” the U.S. Department of Energy reported. “As the amount of wind generation increases, electric power system operators have faced challenges with integrating increasing amounts of this intermittent generation source into their systems.”

Wind is currently the largest source of non-hydro renewable electricity in the U.S.

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By Samuel R. Avro on Mar 21, 2012 with 38 responses

What Makes Up the Cost of a Gallon of Gasoline?

Gas Price Breakdown: It’s All About the Cost of Crude Oil

“What am I paying for in a gallon of gas?” is a question on people’s minds and often posed by regular visitors to Consumer Energy Report. With the assistance of the Energy Information Administration, who provided the data (see the methodology they used for calculating the component percentages at the end of this column), I was able to break it down into a series of charts from 2000-2012.

For a more detailed look into the recent spike in gas prices, see: Charting the Dramatic Gas Price Rise of the Last Decade

Figure 1. The composite share of various components that make up the price of a gallon of gas, 2000-2012.

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By Samuel R. Avro on Mar 14, 2012 with 37 responses

Charting the Dramatic Gas Price Rise of the Last Decade

Different Situation, But Prices Are Not Unprecedented

In a previous column, I pointed out that — perhaps surprisingly — the price we’ve been paying for gas lately, compared to 90 years ago, is not as high as people would think — that is, once the rate of inflation is factored in to the equation.  For instance, while motorists may have been paying only $0.25/gallon in 1919, when converting that number to February 2012 dollars, the cost was $3.35/gallon — a mere 6.5 percent cheaper than 2011′s annual average of $3.57/gallon. The chart below shows the price movement (based on February 2012 dollars) from 1919-2011.

gas prices inflation adjusted
Annual gas prices adjusted for inflation 1919-2011. Cost in Feb. 2012 U.S. Dollars.

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By Samuel R. Avro on Feb 27, 2012 with 83 responses

How High Have Gas Prices Risen Over the Years?

Inflation Adjusted Data

Gas prices are spiraling through the roof like never seen before. People often point to specific years that gas was so cheap, in an effort to blame politicians, Big Oil, or whomever else is the flavor of the day. Indeed, a gallon of gas was going for only a quarter of a dollar in the years after World War I, and even less than that before and after World War II.

A 1920 Standing Liberty Quarter could buy you more than a gallon of gas for most of the years after World War I until after World War II.

But the key fact that’s missing from all the ranting and raving is the rate of inflation. The simple definition of inflation according to Wikipedia is: “A rise in the general level of prices of goods and services in an economy over a period of time.” Keep in mind, that at the end of World War I, average annual income was only $1,500. Currently, annual income is around $50,000.

For this exercise I plotted various sets of data in graphs — sometimes combined — based on information compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) statistical office, the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The purpose of this two-part segment is to provide a clearer understanding of how much the price of gas has actually gone up relative to a family’s budget and other household costs, and most importantly, during what time frame.

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