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By Robert Rapier on Nov 17, 2011 with 19 responses

Announcing R-Squared Energy TV

This week on R-Squared, we are starting a feature that readers have asked for on occasion, and one that Consumer Energy Report editor Sam Avro has been asking me to do for a while now. Each week we will be putting up a short video clip in which I answer readers’ questions or cover some issue that is perhaps best covered with a presentation or other visual means. The video clips are intended to be approximately 5 minutes in length, but since this is the first one it is hard for me to judge how closely we will match that target.

I confess after watching it that I could have been smoother in some of my responses. But I plan to work on that, and anticipate that it will get better as time goes on. Readers who have specific questions can send them to ask [at] consumerenergyreport [dot] com or leave the question after this post (at the original source). Consider subscribing to our YouTube channel where you’ll be able to view past and future videos.

In this first episode, I answer some of the common questions about my background and interest in energy. The questions were as follows:

  • What was the most important motivator(s) which caused me to be so interested in energy, and at what age did this occur?
  • Who, and what, has had the biggest impact on my life?
  • What contributions have I made in terms of energy production?
  • What am I trying to accomplish with my blog?

Link to Original Article: Announcing R-Squared Energy TV

By Robert Rapier

  1. By Justin on November 17, 2011 at 8:32 am

    Good job!

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  2. By Petes on November 17, 2011 at 12:02 pm

    Excellent. Looking forward to future installments.

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  3. By rohar1 on November 17, 2011 at 12:49 pm

    You would think that for someone who lived in Billings (currently +3C) and Scotland (currently 11C, rain) and now lives in Hawaii (currently 25C), you would have a better tan! I think you should work on that for future episodes. :)

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  4. By rrapier on November 17, 2011 at 1:08 pm

    Bob Rohatensky said:

    You would think that for someone who lived in Billings (currently +3C) and Scotland (currently 11C, rain) and now lives in Hawaii (currently 25C), you would have a better tan! I think you should work on that for future episodes. :)


     

    Hey, we had snow this morning! Seriously, there was snow up on Mauna Kea that I could see from my house. It was a bit cooler at my house this morning; about 55 F with the wind blowing and rain. That’s winter in Hawaii.

    But now that you mention it, I do look pretty pale relative to what I have been most of my life. I guess I need to get a makeup person. :)

    RR

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  5. By sameer-kulkarni on November 18, 2011 at 12:15 pm

    Q&A with Mr. Rapier!

    Value addition to the existing blog. 

     

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  6. By Benny BND Cole on November 18, 2011 at 6:22 pm

    I like seeing (for the first time) RR, but actually, reading is faster.

    RR is the foremost energy commentator in the USA today.

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  7. By Russ Finley on November 18, 2011 at 6:44 pm

    I’m with Benny. It takes more time to watch a video. Video is for people who can’t or won’t read. Not a problem with this crowd. I am listening to it while doing other things …like writing this comment.

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  8. By rrapier on November 18, 2011 at 6:58 pm

    Russ Finley said:

    I’m with Benny. It takes more time to watch a video. Video is for people who can’t or won’t read. Not a problem with this crowd. I am listening to it while doing other things …like writing this comment.


     

    I am actually listening to a presentation too while writing this. For me, video is while I am eating lunch each day, or to listen to while I am doing something that doesn’t require my full attention.

    But this will be an additional feature; it won’t impact on regular essays and will generally be for short answers that really don’t warrant a post.

    RR

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  9. By Tom G. on November 19, 2011 at 8:28 pm

    I have no doubt that your videos will be a success.  Just wondering – what equipment are you using to capture the video [camera]?  It looks very professional.   

    Tom G.

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  10. By rrapier on November 19, 2011 at 8:56 pm

    Tom G. said:

    I have no doubt that your videos will be a success.  Just wondering – what equipment are you using to capture the video [camera]?  It looks very professional.   

    Tom G.


     

    The camera is just the built in camera on my Mac. The other stuff that was added in was done by Sam Avro. Not sure what he is using.

    RR

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  11. By moiety on November 19, 2011 at 10:07 am

    I listen to videos mostly kinda like a form of radio. I find that most videos do not require my full attention. So for me it works. Good work.

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  12. By Tom G. on November 19, 2011 at 1:40 pm

    Excellent video and now for everyone who PREFERS to read instead of WATCHING stuff – let us not forget the following parts of our society. As someone who spent years teaching in the adult learning environment [corporate], I have seen examples of every one of the following.

    Visual Learners – learn through seeing – These learners need to see the teacher’s body language and facial expression to fully understand the content of a lesson. They tend to prefer sitting at the front of the classroom to avoid visual obstructions (e.g. people’s heads). They may think in pictures and learn best from visual displays including: diagrams, illustrated text books, overhead transparencies, videos, flipcharts and hand-outs. During a lecture or classroom discussion, visual learners often prefer to take detailed notes to absorb the information.

    Auditory Learners – learn through listening -They learn best through verbal lectures, discussions, talking things through and listening to what others have to say. Auditory learners interpret the underlying meanings of speech through listening to tone of voice, pitch, speed and other nuances. Written information may have little meaning until it is heard. These learners often benefit from reading text aloud and using a tape recorder.

    Tactile/Kinesthetic Learners – Tactile/Kinesthetic persons learn best through a hands-on approach, actively exploring the physical world around them. They may find it hard to sit still for long periods and may become distracted by their need for activity and exploration.

    And now for my question, LOL “How can we more effectively reach out to the Republican Party who seems to be so out of touch when it comes to supporting renewable energy”.

    I am deeply concerned that our next president might just take us back to the drill-baby-drill days when we are just about ready to reaching grid parity with wind and solar.

    Tom Garven
    Lake Havasu City, AZ, USA

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  13. By rrapier on November 19, 2011 at 2:30 pm

    Tom G. said:

    I am deeply concerned that our next president might just take us back to the drill-baby-drill days when we are just about ready to reaching grid parity with wind and solar.

    Tom Garven

    Lake Havasu City, AZ, USA


     

    I think our next president will be Obama. I can’t make a good case for any of the Republican contenders.

    Regarding your other comments; I agree. There are enormous numbers of people who get their information from TV and radio who just don’t like to read much. So hopefully I can appeal to a few more people by adding this format.

    RR

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  14. By armchair261 on November 20, 2011 at 4:56 pm

    And now for my question, LOL “How can we more effectively reach out to the Republican Party who seems to be so out of touch when it comes to supporting renewable energy”.

    I am deeply concerned that our next president might just take us back to the drill-baby-drill days when we are just about ready to reaching grid parity with wind and solar.

    The active rig count when Obama took office was about 900, and it currently stands at a little over 2000. In the month before Obama’s election, US oil production was lower than it had been since the 1940′s. It’s increased by 23% since then, the first sustained rise in US domestic oil production since the early 1980′s.

    Does this mean that the Obama administration is out of touch, that he has a drill-baby-drill mentality?

    Those additional 1,100,000 barrels of oil produced per day in the US have significant price impact (what would the price of oil do tomorrow if we pulled 1,100,000 barrels off the market?), provide thousands of jobs, and help reduce our trade deficit by around $40 billion annually.

    I don’t think it needs to be an either/or solution. I think we need both fosil fuels and renewables, and I think Obama would agree with that as well. Alternative energy researchers, developers, and investors will continue to make progress, and the world’s governments will continue to encourage renewable energy by way of subsidy and other means, regardless of the number of wells drilled in the USA. There were plenty of renewables subsidies in place before Obama took office.

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  15. By Tom G. on November 21, 2011 at 12:58 pm

    armchair261:

    Very interesting and enlighting perspective – enough to make me do some Google searching for “active drill rigs” which I had never done before.  I found the following graph very interesting and hopefully some other readers do as well.

    As you stated in 2008 there were about 2,000 active rigs working.  By the middle of 2009 there were only about 900.  By the end of 2011 it appears we are heading back to about 2,000 active rigs.  The thing I find most interesting is that the number of active rigs closely tracks the price of oil which means to me that the price of oil has a much greater influence than which political party has majority control.

    Thank you for bringing this to my attention.  

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  16. By rrapier on November 21, 2011 at 1:31 pm

    Tom G. said:

    The thing I find most interesting is that the number of active rigs closely tracks the price of oil which means to me that the price of oil has a much greater influence than which political party has majority control.  


     

    Bingo.

    RR

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  17. By Tom G. on November 21, 2011 at 5:51 pm

    RR:

     

    1. O.K so is that ONE of the reason Congress doesn’t raise gasoline taxes?  

    A yes or no answer will do, LOL

     

    2. If a $.25 cent per gallon per year gasoline tax was instituted for 10 years for a total tax of $2.50 would the number of rigs go up or down over time?  It seems to me they would go down since there would be less financial incentive to drill.

    Up or Down?

     

    3.  How much would the cost of gasoline have to increase to significantly impact consumption?  A guess would be fine. 

    Total cost per gallon?

     

    Thank you 

    Tom G. 

     

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  18. By armchair261 on November 21, 2011 at 8:46 pm

    Tom,

    The active rig count does track oil price, but there is more here than price alone going on. A big driver for the drilling activity, and the main driver behind the production increases, is the newly exploited shale plays like the Bakken, Eagle Ford, and Niobrara. There is a frenzy of activity going on here: North Dakota alone has seen its production rise from next to nothing 5+ years ago to almost 500,000 bopd today.

    While I’m here I’ll take a stab at your questions for RR (he can correct me if I’m wrong).

    2. Any tax increase doesn’t flow through to the producers or refiners, and will only tend to lower their sales volumes. I’d expect a small incremental drop in demand leading to a corresponding drop in prices and therefore rigs. But at 25 cents I think the effect would be small, probably too small to impact the rig count, which as I noted above is affected by more than just price. New exploration concepts and general economic outlooks held by oil producers are also key drivers.

    3. I probably should resist answering this one because my memory is a little hazy here… but…. You can go to the EIA’s website and crossplot oil versus gasoline price. I did this once and forget the exact number, but there was as expected a very strong correlation for gasoline prices up to somewhere around $3.50 per gallon. Above that the correlation was still good, but the trendline changed slope. This might be the indicator you’re looking for.

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  19. By Tom G. on November 23, 2011 at 11:12 am

    armchair261; your answers were just fine.  

    I have often wondered if a progressive gas tax would significantly impact production since as you stated, the taxes don’t flow thru to the producers. As we begin the transition to cleaner fuels [gasoline to electric for example] we will need to also restructure and/or adjust our gas tax structure.

    Thank you

    Tom G. 

     

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